Lay Lady Lay Uke tab by Bob Dylan

9 Chords used in the song: G,B,F,Am,D,Em,A,C#m,C

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G G         B B  F F            Am Am           G G B B  F F  Am Am 
Lay lady lay, lay across my big brass bed
G G B B F F Am Am G G B B F F Am Am
Lay lady lay, lay across my big brass bed
D D Em Em G G
Whatever colours you have in your mind
D D Em Em G G
I'll show them to you and you'll see them shine
G G B B F F Am Am G G B B F F Am Am
Lay lady lay, lay across my big brass bed


G G B B F F Am Am A A C#m C#m G G B B
Stay lady stay, stay with your man awhile
G G B B F F Am Am A A C#m C#m G G B B
Until the break of day, let me see you make him smile
D D Em Em G G
His clothes are dirty but his hands are clean
D D Em Em G G
And you're the best thing that he's ever seen
G G B B F F Am Am A A C#m C#m G G B B
Stay lady stay, stay with your man awhile


B B D D Em Em G G
Why wait any longer for the world to begin
B B Am Am G G
You can have your cake and eat it too
B B D D Em Em G G
Why wait any longer for the one you love
B B Am Am
When he's standing in front of you


G G B B F F Am Am A A C#m C#m G G B B
Lay lady lay, lay across my big brass bed
G G B B F F Am Am A A C#m C#m G G B B
Stay lady stay, stay while the night is still ahead
D D Em Em G G
I long to see you in the morning light
D D Em Em G G
I long to reach for you in the night
G G B B F F Am Am A A C#m C#m G G B B
Stay lady stay, stay while the night is still ahead

G G B B F F Am Am G G Am Am B B C C G G

 

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Linusual avatar
B can change for bm better?
04 Sep 2015
About this song

"Lay Lady Lay" is a song written by Bob Dylan and originally released in 1969 on his Nashville Skyline album. The words of the song are sung by Dylan in a low, soft-sounding voice instead of his familiar high-pitched nasal-sounding voice. Dylan credited his "new" voice to quitting smoking before recording the song, but some unreleased bootleg tapes from the early '60s reveal that this was an aspect of his vocal persona that he had actually possessed since at least that time.[1] Released as a single in July of 1969, it became one of Dylan's biggest US Pop chart hits, peaking at number seven.