Custom Made Ukulele

  1. 6 years ago

    I know a custom luthier who made a nice acoustic guitar for a buddy of mine for a steal of a price. I'm debating having him make me a custom ukulele. What should I get it made out of?

  2. The classic Hawaiian uke is koa. The traditional early 20th century uke is mahogany.

    The more exotic woods are newer. I really like the tone of mango.

    The Mya-Moe website has a lot of information about tone woods. It is a very good start. Click under the various links under "Wood" http://www.myamoeukuleles.com/

  3. A custom uke sounds awesome!

  4. A custom made will definitely feel and play different, in a good way. If you have the cash, do it.

  5. "VibroCount" The classic Hawaiian uke is koa. The traditional early 20th century uke is mahogany.

    The more exotic woods are newer. I really like the tone of mango.

    The Mya-Moe website has a lot of information about tone woods. It is a very good start. Click under the various links under "Wood" http://www.myamoeukuleles.com/

    Thank you! I'm planning on getting a custom-made uke too and your advice is very helpful.

  6. Silly question perhaps, but what are the advantages of a custom made one versus a shop-bought one? I guess most of the differences would be in quality and tone of sound?

  7. "Zer0bandit" Silly question perhaps, but what are the advantages of a custom made one versus a shop-bought one? I guess most of the differences would be in quality and tone of sound?

    The guy I was going to go to does amazing work. It's not just quality and sound, but attention to detail. Most store bought ukuleles are pretty plain, simple binding, and nothing fancy. This guy likes to do a million little inlays everywhere. He will cut little strips of wood and work them around the sound hole and on the headstock to accent things. It's the tiny little expensive details that you can't get in any store. And it's hand-made just for me.

  8. Every musician develops personal like and dislikes. Size of uke, width of fretboard, size of frets, thickness of neck. Do you like angled geared tuners which are easy (if slow) to tune, or direct banjo-style peg tuners which are far lighter and make a lighter headstock? They also make geared peg style tuners... Do you want a tenor with four, six, eight strings? If you want a pickup, do you want an active one or a passive one? What wood(s) would you like? Different woods on the neck, top, fretboard, bridge? String spacing, tight or wide or in-between? Dropped G (or D)? Which strings? Binding on the body? If so, what wood or plastic? Soundhole decorations? Binding on the fretboard? Should the headstock match the sides or top of the body, or be unique? Slotted headstock or not? Different soundhole shape or placement? What about the internal braces? What wood and in what configuration? Should the bridge have pins to hold the string ends? Notches? Holes like a classical guitar? How should it be finished? Matte? Gloss? Tung oil back of neck?

    Show me how I can get a maple neck, ebony fretboard, mango sides and back, spruce top, six string, slotted headstock with geared peg tuners, with maple and ebony striped binding on the body only, tenor size, Fishman pickup without tuner... in an over the counter uke. Oh, and instead of dots on the fretboard, I want my name in abalone ... with white pearl dots on the edge of the fretboard. 14 frets to the body, 18 frets total.

    And build me a second one with four strings in concert size, too.

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